Linux Pub Quiz answers

Here are the answers from the quiz. Count up your scores, and discover your guru level at the bottom of the page!

Round 1: People

1 - Larry Ewing 
2 - Bill Joy 
3 - Mark Shuttleworth (founder of Canonical and Ubuntu) 
4 - Guido van Rossum 
5 - Perl 
6 - Postfix 
7 - Eric Allman 
8 - Andy Tanenbaum. His point was that Linux uses a monolithic kernel architecture and
    Tanenbaum believed that micro-kernel architectures were the way forward.
9 - Stephen Bourne 
10 - Richard Stallman

Round 2: Sysadmin

11 - You have a directory with a name starting with the letter f that contains the files
     apple, orange and banana 
12 - /etc/sudoers 
13 - The Grub bootloader config file (probably /boot/grub/menu.lst) 
14 - /var/log 
15 - Hello World 
16 - Zero 
17 - Port 22 
18 - Run ls -i foo to find the inumber (say it's 12345), then run find . -inum 12345 
     Have a bonus mark if you did it with one command like this:
     find . -inum $(ls -i main.cf | cut -d' ' -f1) 
19 - The password! The hashed passwords are in /etc/shadow for security 
20 - ext3 includes journalling, ext2 does not

Round 3: Commands

21 - It tells the shell to include filenames that begin with '.' when expanding
     wildcards 
22 - mj@ucw.cz (This is really obscure. Run strings on the Linux kernel to get it!) 
23 - rm -- -r 
24 - It would be shown as --S--S--T 
25 - It deletes the current line 
26 - clone(). OK, you can have a mark for fork() if you want 
27 - In the first case, foo will be owned by whoever is logged in. In the second case,
     foo will be owned by root 
28 - iptables 
29 - /etc/inittab 
30 - Six (there is one link from the parent directory, the '.' link in the directory
     itself, and six '..' links from the subdirectories) 
31 - find / -type p 
32 - Redirect it to /dev/null

Round 4: Names

33 - Ethereal
34 - GNU Network Object Model Environment
35 - Originally it was the 'Kool Desktop Environment', but now it doesn't
     really mean anything.
36 - Oasis. It stands for 'Organisation for the Advancement of Structured Information
     Standards', which is the name of the consortium that developed the standard) 
37 - After its inventors, Aho, Weinberger and Kernighan 
38 - Pluggable Authentication Modules
39 - Warty Warthog
40 - The German phrase 'Software und System Entwicklung' (software and system development).
     You can have half a mark just for knowing it was something in German. 
41 - Yggdrasil 
42 - From the names of its founder, Ian Murdoch, and his wife, Debra 

Round 5: Through the keyhole

43 - Gimp 
44 - OpenOffice.org
45 - CUPS' webmin interface 
46 - K3b  
47 - KCalc 
48 - KDE main menu tabs (from OpenSUSE 10.3) 
49 - KMail 
50 - Rosegarden  
51 - XChat
52 - GNU/Emacs

Round 6: Distros

53 - LPI 101, LPI 102 and LPI 199 
54 - Lindows 
55 - Mandrake 
56 - A chameleon 
57 - Xandros

Round 7: Applications

58 - Nautilus 
59 - Apache 
60 - "Zip" was named to imply that it was faster than competing compression formats at the time
61 - A text editor intended for editing HTML and other web content
62 - A lightweight window manager 
63 - An open-source content management system 
64 - A multi-protocol instant messenger 
65 - A text-based mail user agent 
66 - A device that can turn on and off the power of another computer under
     software control. Stonith stands for 'shoot the other node in the head'
     and the device is used to guarantee that an ailing node in a high-availability
     cluster is shut down. 

Round 8: Name that logo

67 - Firefox 
68 - Gnome
69 - Ubuntu
70 - Gimp 
71 - Wireshark 
72 - Debian 

Round 9: Odds and sods

73 - Six 
74 - Mono 
75 - 1991 (25 August to be precise) 
76 - Seven million (actually 7107577) 
     The command we ran was: find /usr/src/linux -name '*.c' -exec cat {} \; | wc
77 - Jurassic Park 
78 - Sun Microsystems 
79 - A snail (in a secure shell, of course)
80 - Perl
81 - Red Hat
82 - The US National Security Agency (NSA) 

Round 10: Name that guru

83 - Bruce Perens (open source advocate) 
84 - Guido van Rossum (creator of Python) 
85 - Richard Stallman (founder of the GNU project and the Free Software Foundation) 
86 - Rasmus Lerdorf (creator of PHP) 
87 - Jeremy Allison (best known for his work on Samba) 
88 - Miguel de Icaza (developer of Gnome, Mono, and more) 
89 - Vint Cerf ('the father of the internet') 
90 - Alan Cox (famed Linux kernel hacker) 




How you scored

0-20: The road is long, grasshopper, with many a winding install disc. Our blessings with you on your journey.

21-50: You're showing solid progress - try reading some of our tutorials to learn more!

51-70: This is more like it! You know your RPM from your elbow, and tweaking xorg.conf is child's play.

71-89: Serious geek territory: you're a bona-fide Linux expert. You're probably multi-booting six different distros, all with recompiled kernels, and you're planning to install Linux on your fridge.

90: Hey, Linus! We were just kidding that you wouldn't know all these answers, you know...



Be sure to post your scores and let us know how you did!

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