How to install Gnome Do in 3 minutes

Apps

Gnome Do is easily the coolest piece of software on any Linux desktop right now, so it's no surprise you want to try it for yourself and see whether it lives up to all the hype. Well, follow these simple instructions for Ubuntu 8.10 and you'll have it up and running in minutes - and you can get on with trying all its features!

We've included as many screenshots as we possibly can to make it easy enough for everyone to try Gnome Do - there's no excuse any more.

Step One: Save the authentication key for Gnome Do

Select this block of text and copy it to your clipboard by pressing Ctrl+C:

-----BEGIN PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK-----
Version: SKS 1.0.10

mI0ESXUVdQEEAN8ALfH3wueKsSgDwA/HVEHdB7nlppqGKW/tubvGTy0ayf4M9ylX45szZK97
uL9/UHh5/B7eGMSB45EMJ0/qvTiflS6SwCxRCoKCW1PpYZlVcOLh5UUBkyREPJZcki1lK7pf
xvG9LkYKnvBP89s2PnO5LlDheEsVR4SqDGEtich/ABEBAAG0JExhdW5jaHBhZCBQUEEgZm9y
IEdOT01FIERvIENvcmUgVGVhbYi2BBMBAgAgBQJJdRV1AhsDBgsJCAcDAgQVAggDBBYCAwEC
HgECF4AACgkQKKggUHdVjdCVeAP+ONJtMFx9MGSJe33YiskagXEG5cQGYdDi5sWWUAP80bP1
Qe+Dsnjs3VKQ9ZZW3M8UNXsoFFN501hgJFBwUUCWIRSGZkzVgKoZZtZOe0Dws39xfV//8JFS
Te/r0oPzrr10iTFupTe/wBR0M9JbKGdY7SvooyqU+W2rf8/LldGx7KE=
=3C2V
-----END PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK-----

Now go to Accessories > Text Editor to open up Gedit, then paste that block of text into the new document window.

How to install Gnome Do on Ubuntu

Go to File > Save or press Ctrl+S to save the file. When you're prompted for a filename, call it "dokey".

How to install Gnome Do on Ubuntu

 

Step Two: Add the Gnome Do key to Software Sources

From the System menu go to Administration > Software Sources, then enter your password when prompted.

How to install Gnome Do on Ubuntu

In the Software Sources window, choose the Authentication tab and click the Import Key File button from the bottom-left corner of the window.

How to install Gnome Do on Ubuntu

Browse to where you saved the "dokey" file a moment ago and select it.

How to install Gnome Do on Ubuntu

When you press OK with "dokey" selected it should appear in the list of Trusted Software Providers.

How to install Gnome Do on Ubuntu

 

Step Three: Add a new software source

Still inside the Software Sources window, choose the Third Party Software tab and click the Add button in the bottom-left corner of the window.

How to install Gnome Do on Ubuntu

When prompted for "APT line", paste this into the box:

deb http://ppa.launchpad.net/do-core/ppa/ubuntu intrepid main
How to install Gnome Do on Ubuntu

You can replace "intrepid" with "hardy" or "jaunty" if you're using 8.04 or 9.04.

Click Add Source and you'll see the new source in the Third Party Software and it will already be enabled.

How to install Gnome Do on Ubuntu

When you click Close to get rid of the Software Sources window, a box will appear telling you that the information about the available software is out of date - click Reload here.

How to install Gnome Do on Ubuntu

Now be patient. This takes a few seconds to complete.

How to install Gnome Do on Ubuntu

 

Step Four: Install Gnome Do

Once the Software Sources window has gone away, choose Administration > Synaptic Package Manager from the System menu.

How to install Gnome Do on Ubuntu

When Synaptic appears, choose the Origin button near the bottom-left of the window, and it will show you a list of all the software sources you have configured.

How to install Gnome Do on Ubuntu

In the list of software sources, you should see one called "ppa.launchpad.net/universe" - click that, and you should see the packages "gnome-do" and "gnome-do-plugins" appear in the top-right frame.

How to install Gnome Do on Ubuntu

Right-click on "gnome-do" and choose Mark For Installation.

How to install Gnome Do on Ubuntu

Installing gnome-do will automatically bring in lots of other dependencies, including the extra gnome-do-plugins package. Click Mark in the window that appears then click Apply from the toolbar to install it all.

How to install Gnome Do on Ubuntu
How to install Gnome Do on Ubuntu
How to install Gnome Do on Ubuntu
How to install Gnome Do on Ubuntu
How to install Gnome Do on Ubuntu

 

All done!

Gnome Do is now installed - go to Applications > Accessories > Gnome Do to run it.

How to install Gnome Do on Ubuntu

When it first runs, you'll see a large brown rectangle with two boxes inside and the words "Type to start searching." That's it, you're all done - have fun!

How to install Gnome Do on Ubuntu

 

Er, wait a minute...

OK, OK - so maybe you'd like to hear a little bit about why Gnome Do is cool. After all, a brown box with some text isn't very interesting, right? Well, here are some tips to help you get started.

Type to start searching

When Gnome Do is active, just start pressing keys and it will match those keypresses against its database of interesting things. For example, typing "term" will match against Gnome Terminal and you'll see its icon appear - press Enter to run it.

The right-hand box shows you what action will be taken when you press Enter. For the Gnome Terminal, as you just saw, that was "Run". But if you press Tab to select the other box, then press the Down cursor key, you can bring up a list of possible options for what you have typed such as Copy To Clipboard.

How to install Gnome Do on Ubuntu

Quick launch

Once Gnome is running, you can show and hide its window at any time by pressing Super+Space - the "Super" key is the Windows key for most people. So now you can run any program by pressing Windows+Space, typing a few letters in its name, then pressing Enter to run it.

We would recommend automatically running Gnome Do at system startup. To do that, click the small arrow in the top-right of the Gnome Do window and choose Preferences. From the General tab, check the first two options and click Close.

How to install Gnome Do on Ubuntu

Plugins

Gnome Do ships with a big stack of plugins and they are what really transforms it into something mind-bogglingly clever. From the Preferences window choose the Plugins tab, then change "Show Official Plugins" to "Show All Plugins". Here are the ones we'd recommend you try:

  • Banshee
  • Files and Folders
  • Firefox
  • Gnome Dictionary
  • Google Contacts*
  • Google Docs*
  • Google Search
  • Locate Files
  • Microblogging*
  • TinyURL
  • Tomboy

We've put an asterisk next to the ones that need to be configured.

How to install Gnome Do on Ubuntu

Taking the Microblogging plugin as an example - that's the one that lets you send short messages to Twitter and Identi.ca - press Windows+Space to bring up Gnome Do and start typing. When you're done, Gnome Do will probably recommend using Google Search to find that text, so press Tab then Down to show the list of options. Scroll down the list of options and choose Post to Identica, and Gnome Do will, er, do it. Easy!

How to install Gnome Do on Ubuntu

If you find that Gnome Do is bringing up application matches when really you've just typed in a few words, what you need is Raw Text mode. To activate that, just press the full stop/period key (that's ".") before typing anything.

Making Gnome Do more beautiful

Gnome Do comes with five themes, defaulting to "Classic". You can choose a new one by going to Preferences and selecting the Appearance tab.

How to install Gnome Do on Ubuntu

The Mini Interface theme.

How to install Gnome Do on Ubuntu

The Nouveau theme.

How to install Gnome Do on Ubuntu

The Glass theme.

And let's not forget Docky...

The big new feature in the latest Gnome Do release is Docky, which is Yet Another Apple Dock clone - but just so happens to be one of the best efforts yet, so we don't mind so much!

How to install Gnome Do on Ubuntu

As Docky is just a theme for Gnome Do, you can click the Summon Gnome Do button to start typing. It matches your letters as you type, as can be seen below - we had just typed "term"

How to install Gnome Do on Ubuntu

That little + sign in the left corner of Docky adds that program to Docky so you can just click on it in the future.

 

It gets better with time

The reason Gnome Do is neat is because it remembers which things you use most often, and gives them priority. That means overtime you'll use fewer keystrokes because Gnome Do will automagically select the right option based on your usage history.

The real power of Gnome Do lies in its plugins, so hunt through the list and see which ones work best for you!

How to install Gnome Do on Ubuntu

You should follow us on Identi.ca or Twitter


Your comments

Gnome-DO, definitely cool

This look like alot of fun, in the GTD sense!

No Docky if you're running Hardy

Just thought I'd mention that so you don't get too excited. Of course you could compile it yourself, but compiling's a young man's game, and I'm too old and decrepit. Or lazy, I can never remember which one.

I just went for AWN instead - not quite the same, but fills the gap 'til I update my buntu.

Love, Light and Peace, Crispibits

Does this work on 8.04 lpia?

Still very new to Ubuntu (linux generally) and so apologies if this is a bit of an 'obvious' question. Will this work on my Dell mini 9 which uses an lpia version of 8.04?

I really hope so!!

Thanks

At Previous Commenter

Krunner doesn't work so hot outside of KDE... Additionally its memory usage (which is more considerable than you might think) is hidden away in other processes due to plasma and its widgetry (lots gets offloaded to the xorg process). That and GNOME Do uses closer to around 20MB not 50MB.

Basically what I am telling you is that you should stop spreading FUD (as in f'd up disinformation, as well as fear, uncertainty, and doubt) and think before you speak.

At Previous Commenter

The variuos Mono libraries are what eats up the 50MB.

If GNOME Do by itself takes 20MB, that is a whopping 70MB that you can save by not loading this frippery.

Puppy Linux manages to fit an entire distribution into approximately that same amount of space.

If one avoids just a few GNOME applications, typically such as GNOME Do, Tomboy Notes, FSpot and Banshee, it is entirely possible to keep your GNOME desktop free of Mono infestation, and save yourself the 50MB disk space as a bonus.

If you run a nice, lean KDE 4.2 or later, one gets the equivalent (or better) applications in Krunner, Basket Notes, Digikam and Amarok without any Mono infestation at all.

KDE runs this stuff faster than GNOME and it takes up less space on disk, and given the recently announced release of a new version of Qt, version 4.5, with significant performance enhancements, no doubt KDE 4.3 will be even faster. Qt 4.5 is now released under the LGPL license, which makes it even better.

Mono, OTOH, contains in part technologies such as Windows.forms, ADO.NET and ASP.NET which are not licensed by Microsoft to run anywhere but Windows, (with the possible exception of SLED).

Oh I see... You Are Worried About...

.3 cents worth of hard drive space. (Based on a 500GB hard drive for $60 at newegg).

Well I can see why its worrying you... I must apologize, I thought you were talking about RAM. You actually had a better argument if you stuck with RAM, but ya blew it. Nobody cares about 70MB, but just to correct you. The most basic mono install is 10MB, and if its bigger on your distro go talk to them, because they suck at packaging.

As for your mono FUD, clearly you have no idea whats going on what so ever. Microsoft releases many of its technologies used in .NET under the MS-PL which *is* a GPL compatable open source license. Everything else is rewritten from scratch.

And dont give me crap about patents, there are so many MS patents the linux desktop infringes on I doubt mono matters. KDE is far from free of this. Further I doubt any of this matters in a post Bilski world. Microsoft isn't going to move to sue on any of their patents right now that are not tied in at least a somewhat firm manner to a physical device. .NET by its very nature is not.

Oh and KDE 4 is an unusable piece of crap so much so even Torvalds jumped ship.

I don't see Krunner doing

I don't see Krunner doing all of the things Gnome DO does, sorry. With the plugins that come even by default in it, it does a lot more than launching a program.

No, you don't see what there was to worry about.

>Microsoft releases many of its technologies used in .NET under the MS-PL which *is* a GPL compatable open source license. Everything else is rewritten from scratch.

There are indeed some technologies (even parts of .NET) that Microsoft makes standard, such as C# etc, and then there are also other (vital, core) bits which it doesn't ... such as Windows.forms, ADO.NET and ASP.NET (implementations of which are in Mono) ... oh, and apparently some hack about enabling "long file names" within the old DOS FAT 8.3 directory formats.

It doesn't matter one whit about "everything else is rewritten from scratch" as the company Tom Tom is about to find out. If it is Microsoft technology (and even if it isn't but they do have a dubious patent) ... they could sue. Regardless if the FAT code in Linux was "re-written from scratch" or not. Immaterial. In the case of Tom Tom's use of Linux, they have sued.

Why invite grief such as that, just because Microsoft are scared spitless about Linux. Just ditch the Mono libraries and you are good to go.

Ditching mono makes you no more "good to go"

The FAT patent is probably only getting enforced because they have a shot at tying it down to a physical device in some way. Thats not true of .NET by its very nature, and they wont risk losing those patents Bilski style. You are good to go regardless.

As for KDE 4.2, I used it, it's crap... or maybe I just said that to show what kind of blind fanboyism you are displaying and how worthless it is to think like that. Live and let live and stop spreading FUD. (thanks for taking the bait)

Never mind that b***s

Why the hell isn't that latest version in the hardy repos?! FFFFffffuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu.

I compiled the whole damn thing and the performance of docky isn't too great. I can see why as there are some funky mono dependencies going on (basically, it builds all right from intrepid repos but not from hardy) and changes in .Net. I had to modify some source to get the damn thing to compile which clearly isn't right.

Sort it out please somebody? Please? OMG the captcha is a mind bender $430-million is that? >_<

Hardy and GNOME Do

Hardy has a very very old version of Mono and will not work with the current release of GNOME Do.

The performance issues you are experiencing are probably due to nvidia drivers. They have very poor XRender performance for anything older than the 180.xx series. Docky will be slow as all get out until you get the 180.xx series drivers on your system.

Ah well...

It's a bloody shame then really that hardy is so far behind 'cos I love the look of Docky and the Gnome integration is a +ve over awn. Can't upgrade as I use a rt kernel on a dual-core :(

Love it

Do is excellent. I'm finding it to be very useful and efficient.

Love the podcast, keep it going.

Works in Hardy

I had to build mono, his friends and Do in Hardy but really worth the efford

What a dumb, it's already in KDE

"As for KDE 4.2, I used it, it's crap... or maybe I just said that to show what kind of blind fanboyism you are displaying and how worthless it is to think like that. Live and let live and stop spreading FUD. (thanks for taking the bait)"

You said this probably, because you're a Gnome fanboy. Gnome lives only, because some Gnome guys are in charge in few distros and they made it a default DE. Gnome hurts Linux a lot. It corrupted people data some time ago and it's lacking of basic features. It's a big, bloated and sluggish piece of crap.

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