The Best Linux Applications: Free for All

Apps

OK, it's the end of the week (in fact, it nearly came and went!) and time for our final pseudo category: free for all.

As the name suggests, anything goes. Maybe your favourite application didn't quite fit in the other categories. Or perhaps you just want to give your favourite application another vote just because it's so great. Or even, this would be really cool, you want to delve into more detail telling us how you use or what you use your favourite program for - we're always really interested to hear how people make use of all the amazing tools that Linux makes available.

Podcast Season 3 Episode 11

Podcast

Title: Come back Mike!

In this episode: Mageia 1.0 has been released while ASUS promises three new netbooks running Linux. Meanwhile, back in California, Oracle tries to give OpenOffice.org to the Apache Foundation and you can hear some of our best discoveries, our worst challenge results, and your own opinions in our Open Ballot.

The Best Linux Applications: Sys Admin & Development

Apps

This is the penultimate entry in our week long series of posts asking you to nominate your favourite Linux applications.

Today, we want to know what tools you use to create new software and ease the management of your systems. Puppet or Eucalyptus; Tripwire, Nessus or SELinux; Eclipse, Emacs or Vi? You tell us... so go ahead and get commenting.

The Best Linux Applications: Communications & The Web

Apps

This is the third in our week-long series in which we're asking you to nominate your favourite Linux applications.

Once again, your comments to yesterday's post made for excellent reading. We didn't have such high hopes for Office and Productivity applications, but your insights have shown us that Linux has a wealth of such applications available outside of LibreOffice/OpenOffice - many of which have already made it on to some of our systems!

Open Ballot: Do you trust the "cloud"?

TuxRadar

Cloud storage: everyone's talking about it. Dropbox is all the rage, Apple has got into the game with iCloud, and we Linux users have Ubuntu One. But as we gear up for our next podcast, we want to know: do you feel safe with your data in the cloud? Is it the future of storage and backup, or just a fad that'll disappear after a few major security incidents? Maybe all your data is in the cloud, and you think everyone else is being paranoid.

Whatever the case, we'd love to hear your thoughts and experiences. Tap your musings into the comment box below, give yourself a way neater name than Anonymous Penguin, and we'll read out the best in our podcast.

The Best Linux Applications: Office & Productivity

Apps

This is the second in our week-long series in which we're asking you to nominate your favourite Linux applications.

Yesterday's post, covering multimedia applications, was a great success! Some wonderful suggestions were made in the comments, including a number of applications that we hadn't come across before but look excellent. Looks like we'll be working our internet connection extra hard in the coming weeks as we download and test everything we can.

The Best Linux Applications: Multimedia

Apps

In issue 148, we're going to be running a feature on the best Linux applications. While we've all sat around and talked about our favourites, we want to hear some of your suggestions as well. So, each day this week we'll put up a post asking for suggestions from a particular category.

Today's category is multimedia applications. This is a pretty broad one - photo organisers, audio and video editors, drum machines, podcatchers, synthesisers and most anything else related - so if you think it counts, it probably does!

CakePHP Tutorial: Storage, Baking and Slugs

Code

In the previous article we built a movie database that enabled you to store all your movies in various formats, and showed the basics of getting a CakePHP project off the ground. This time around the block we’re going to use some of the same approaches to build a more complicated application that involves more models for data storage, and demonstrates the associations between models and just how darn easy it is.

Radical New Interface for Windows 8

Gnome

Jonathan Roberts says:

A lot of time has been spent discussing the new interface that's come by default with Gnome 3. Plenty of people aren't very keen on it, thinking it's a bad idea to try and create a single interface that scales on mobile devices, touch screens and traditional desktops; they also think it's a bad idea because it breaks lots of familiar habits and forces users to re-learn how to use their computer.

Well, I thought it was worth noting that now Microsoft is now heading down the same path, having just announced a radical new interface for Windows 8.

Podcast Season 3 Episode 10

Podcast

Title: Lovelock and load

In this episode: Fedora 15 has arrived and the next release of the kernel may be called 3.0. We discover some interesting things, comment on the awesome IRC session we all joined, come up with an adopt-a-project plan and ask, should Gnome become Linux-only?

adaptableGIMP

Gimp

There's a wonderful article on LWN.net at the moment, 'Usability and adaptableGIMP.'

It details the work of Michael Terry, a human-computer interaction expert, into an alternative interface for the GIMP. This interface is task orientated and constructed based on an analysis of search engine queries relating to the image editing program. Once a user selects a task, a new tool palette is presented to the user with the tools needed to complete the task presented in the appropriate order. It's something of a 'built-in tutorial,' although it feels like far more than this.

Linux Format issue 146 is on sale now!

LXF


A new Ubuntu release always generates a certain amount of chatter in Linuxland, but nothing compares to the impact of Ubuntu 11.04. This signals a new direction for Canonical, with the familiar Gnome 2.x desktop being replaced by Unity, which significantly alters how we interact with our computers. In our cover feature we show you how to master Unity, we talk to the developers behind the desktop, and also probe Mark Shuttleworth for his thoughts too.

CakePHP Tutorial: Build Web Apps Faster

Code

The pressure is on. You’ve got limited time, and you need a system to catalogue your extensive movie collection in 15 minutes. Who ya gonna call? CakePHP of course! CakePHP is a rapid application development framework that covers all the common tasks required to get a web application up and running. Handling all the repetitive tasks means you have more time for coffee, games, or whatever else you’d rather be doing. This introductory article will guide you through the creation of a media library application to record what movies you have.

Open Ballot: Should Gnome become Linux-only?

TuxRadar

Here's a thought. The Gnome desktop currently runs on a wide variety of OSes, including Linux, the BSDs and Solaris. One hacker has proposed making Gnome Shell dependent on systemd, a boot and services system that only runs on Linux. This would require that all distros that use Gnome also take up systemd, and limit the desktop to one OS - and as expected, it has generated a huge amount of discussion in the free software world.

As we prepare to record our next podcast, we want your opinions for our Open Ballot: should Gnome become a Linux-only project? Would tighter integration with Linux-only technologies produce a more streamlined, coherent OS? Or would dropping support for more esoteric platforms be against the spirit of freedom and free software?

Let us know in the comments below, but please don't commit a name-fail and call yourself Anonymous Penguin.

The full story: Friday's IRC chat

TuxRadar

Missed our Internet Relay Chat event on Friday? Bursting to find out what happened, what was said, and how much Mike talked about Frontier? Well, we've put online the whole log of the two hours and 25 minutes of action...

Patent News

Community

You may have seen that there was a report published this month, Digital Opportunity: A Review of Intellectual Property and Growth. While most press reports on it have covered what it has to say about copyright - with good reason mind you, it's thoughful and frank - there were some other sections in it of significance to free software.

Don't miss our IRC session on Friday

TuxRadar

Just a quick note for those who didn't listen to the last podcast recording (naughty, naughty): on Friday 20th of May, at 15:00 British Summer Time, the team behind Linux Format magazine and TuxRadar will be on IRC for chat japes galore. Log into irc.freenode.net and join the channel #linuxformat to ask us questions, tell us what you're thinking and chat with other LXF/TuxRadar readers. If you've never used IRC (Internet Relay Chat) before, we recommend X-Chat as a good graphical client, and Irssi if you're a command-line kinda guy or gal. See you there!

Send us your desktop!

LXF

That is, a photo of your actual, physical desktop (not a screenshot). You may remember that, long ago, we use to have "Anatomy of a Geek Desktop" on the back page of Linux Format magazine. Well, it's coming back, and we'd love to feature awesome reader/listener desktops. If you want to take part, send us a high-quality JPG image of 1600x1200 pixels, preferably no more than 4MB, to Mike Saunders along with some text describing your computer, the surroundings and any other interesting bits 'n bobs you have lying around. If we like it, we'll print it in the mag!

Cuba leading the Linux revolution

Linux

Royal Pingdom has gathered together an interesting set of stats, showing Linux's popularity (on the desktop) in various places around the world. It has built up an impressive 6.3% market share over in Cuba, and is doing well in many African countries too. Macedonia, Finland and Spain are the top European countries for Linux adoption, although the figures there are still quite small. Still, the author guesstimates that there are around 15 million active desktop Linux users out there - a number not to be sniffed at.

What'll be the next big market for Linux? Does it help consumer adoption when governments make moves towards the OS?

Podcast Season 3 Episode 9

Podcast

Title: Final Frontier

In this episode: David Braben creates a low-cost Linux machine. Matt Zimmerman leaves Canonical while Mark Shuttleworth wants 200 million Ubuntu users within 4 years. Discover our discoveries, hear the latest conversion stories from TuxRadar and join us on IRC.

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